A Time to Mourn

A Time to Mourn

The older I get, the more emotional I have become.  I have always been a bit of a stoic but, now children’s stories and sermon illustrations easily choke me up.  I try to pass these episodes off as dramatic pauses, but in reality I can’t read The Three Trees or Papa Panov’s Special Day or recount poignant sermon illustrations without turning into an emotional mess.   As I reflect on why this is, I have come to believe that with more of life’s water under the bridge, those stories and illustrations bear a strong resemblance to my own stories and my own grief – grief over opportunities and people lost and grief over my callousness to God’s grace and insensitivity to His presence.

But I have also come to understand that grief is a normal part of life.   Though it often takes us by surprise, it is not unexpected.  The longer we live, the more grief we live with.  Grief is not contrary to faith, nor a lack of faith.   Indeed, Jesus was a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief.  At the tomb of Lazarus and in the midst of the Triumphal Entry, “Jesus wept.”   In the Garden of Gethsemane, Jesus said that His soul was “sorrowful unto death.”  And Jesus’ faith and knowledge were complete and He was in perfect communion with the Heavenly Father.   Yet He was “acquainted with grief.”  Grief is a part of life in this fallen world.  Being a Christian does not change this, it only changes how we respond to it.

I appreciate the wisdom of Solomon in Ecclesiastes 3.  He notes that life “under the sun” is a life with seasons.

For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven:

a time to be born, and a time to die;
a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted; …
a time to weep, and a time to laugh;
a time to mourn, and a time to dance;
a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
a time to seek, and a time to lose;
a time to keep, and a time to cast away;
a time to tear, and a time to sew;
a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; …. 

He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also, he has put eternity into man’s heart. —  Ecclesiastes 3:1-10

There is a time to mourn, a time to grieve.  But grief can be complicated.  Each person’s “Tear Soup” requires different ingredients, different cooking times, and has unique complex flavors.   Grief brings complexity to our feelings and to our faith.  Grief challenges the clichés by which we live and confronts us with the God who IS, and not the God we imagined.    But God has not left us without guidance for our grief.  His Holy Spirit is often called, in Scripture, the “Comforter.”  This Comforter inspired chosen men of old to give us words to speak, pray, and sing in the Psalms to teach us how to grieve.   John Calvin famously noted, regarding the Psalms,

I have been accustomed to call this book, I think not inappropriately, “An Anatomy of all the Parts of the Soul;” for there is not an emotion of which any one can be conscious that is not here represented as in a mirror. Or rather, the Holy Spirit has here drawn to the life all the griefs, sorrows, fears, doubts, hopes, cares, perplexities, in short, all the distracting emotions with which the minds of men are wont to be agitated.  

John Calvin, Preface to Commentary on the Psalms.

And we have many examples in Scripture of grief observed.   Jeremiah’s emotional confessions and lamentations are potent examples.   Jeremiah is known as the “weeping prophet.”   As one commenter noted, he was “never a dispassionate observer of his nation’s sufferings, but entered into the anguish of the people and suffered with them….  [He bore] a message of divine judgement while at the same time sharing the sufferings of the people…. [He was a man] torn asunder between God and the people, to both of whom [he] was bound with deep ties.”  (The Book of Jeremiah, J. A. Thompson)

In Jeremiah 8 and 9 we encounter the prophet in the depths of complex and conflicting grief over the sin and judgment of Judah.  God has called us to draw near to observe his grief to instruct us how to grieve over the sin and judgment of our own time.   In Jeremiah’s grief we see the necessities, complexities, expansiveness and available comfort for our grief – grief over our own sin and loss, and over that of our people.

Join us this Sunday, September 8, as we consider how the example of Jeremiah instructs us to grieve when it is a “time to mourn.”  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.

Palliative Christianity

Palliative Christianity

English is a rich and nuanced language.  It has an uncanny ability to describe things with surgical precision.  Yet like many powerful tools, we rarely use it to its fullest.   For example, while the thesaurus — a Greek word for treasure box, not a prehistoric reptile — has a vast array of words to describe every conceivable affection we might have, we use the word “love” for them all.  We love our wife and children and we love our fried chicken, yet those “loves” are quite different.  Many powerfully precise words are used copiously and carelessly.  In the immortal words of Inigo Montoya, “You keep using that word.  I don’t think that word means what you think it means.”

As the debate over end of life issues spills over from the ivory tower of medical ethicists to culture at large, the word “palliative” has become part of our everyday vocabulary.   “Palliative care” is one of those highly charged phrases used by a wide range of people to mean a wide range of things.   According to the dictionary, to palliate means to “make (a disease or its symptoms) less severe or unpleasant without removing the cause.”   In layman’s terms this means “comfort care.”

I am a strong supporter of hospice care.  When no curative option remains for a terminal diagnosis, “comfort care” is life-extending care.  Palliative care harmonizes perfectly with the answer to the Shorter Catechism’s question, “What is required in the Sixth Commandment? The Sixth Commandment requireth all lawful endeavours to preserve our own life, and the life of others.”  For a great discussion of this issue from a Reformed perspective let me recommend Christopher Bogosh’s Compassionate Jesus.

As a hospice chaplain, I have encountered many who view palliative care as tantamount to either medical neglect or euthanasia.  But the hard truth is that medical science cannot stop death.  The Scripture reminds us that everyone will face death. “It is appointed unto man once to die and then to face the judgement.”  Medical technology has allowed us to extend life, but not indefinitely.  There are times when palliative care is the most life-extending and life-choosing thing we can do.  And it is not predicated on the false, unbiblical dichotomy that pits “quality of life” against “quantity of life.”  Palliative care is based God’s command for Christians to exercise compassion and care to the sick and the dying.

But with that said, there is an area where palliative care is never appropriate.  And that is in regard to a diagnosis of eternal death because of sin.  God is indeed a God of comfort, but his greatest comfort is the comfort of the gospel, the healing balm of Gilead, which is offered to all as the curative answer to our sin and misery.  When it comes to eternal life and eternal death, palliative spiritual care — an attempt to “make our sin-sickness less severe or unpleasant without removing the cause” — is the most uncompassionate, hateful, and uncaring care we can offer.   God’s comfort in the gospel comes by way of the means of our discomfort with our sin.  The prophet Hosea calls us.

Come, let us return to the Lord;
    for he has torn us, that he may heal us;
    he has struck us down, and he will bind us up.  Hosea 6:1

To offer palliative care for the sin sick soul is indeed spiritual neglect and “mal-thanasia.”   Yet this is exactly what the prophets and priests, the pastors and elders, of Jeremiah’s day were doing – offering palliative care, saying “Peace, peace” when there was no peace, with men or with God.  Twice, Jeremiah points the prophetic finger at these hireling shepherds.

They have healed the wound of my people lightly,
    saying, ‘Peace, peace,’
    when there is no peace.  Jeremiah 8:12

The shepherds were offering comfort care — palliative Christianity — when curative care was at hand.  And the people had become comfortably numb.  The prophet is astonished that while even the animals are responsive to God’s sovereign design, His people persistently resist His grace and have become “numb and number.”   What type of care are you seeking for the terminal diagnosis of sin?  Have you sought to the certain cure of God’s grace and mercy through faith in the finished work of Jesus Christ?  Or have you enrolled in palliative Christianity that affirms and confirms that your sin is not really a problem and that everything we be just fine?  Are you becoming numb and number?

Join us this Sunday, September 1 as we consider from Jeremiah 8:4-22 the terminal dangers of becoming numb to our spiritual condition.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there

Spin

Spin

Long before my lofty aspirations to software design and pastoral ministry, I harbored thoughts of another noble, yet more humble vocation – that of the garbage man.  Every Tuesday was trash day on Inca Court.   I would help my dad carry the cans to the curb before he left for work and then I would eagerly await the arrival of the trash truck, sitting by the curb to get a front row seat for the action.  I dreamed of donning an orange jump-suit and swinging from the back of the truck as it moved from house to house.  I was not discouraged by the distinctive aroma.  Nothing seemed more sensible and adventurous than being a garbage-man.   Though we cannot call them that now.  The simplicity of their craft is now obscured by titles such as “sanitation engineer.”  Ironically, by elevating the language of their craft we show contempt for their vocation.

A “euphemism” is the use of language to make the unpalatable, palatable.  But we call it “spin” or “political correctness.”  It is the art of using pleasant speech to transform what is morally repugnant to something we can more conscientiously ignore.  For example, the rhetoric of abortion-rights advocates is rife with euphemism – and indeed depends upon it.   Labels such as “pro-choice,” “Planned Parenthood,” “women’s rights,” and “reproductive health” are utterly disingenuous.   Nothing is further from the minds of abortion providers than parenthood.  And in what way can killing your offspring be considered “reproductive health?” And what about the choice and rights of unborn women?

Christian apologist, Ravi Zacharias, commenting on the Tower of Babel, conjectured that God confused the languages of the people because they used their words to create a rival reality to the one He revealed through His Word.   Spin, political correctness, and euphemism are sedatives we take from the hard realities of sin and responsibility.   No one expresses euphemism’s deceitfulness, quite like G. K. Chesterton.   The quote is long, but worth the read.

Most Eugenists are Euphemists. I mean merely that short words startle them, while long words soothe them. And they are utterly incapable of translating the one into the other, however obviously they mean the same thing. Say to them “The persuasive and even coercive powers of the citizen should enable him to make sure that the burden of longevity in the previous generation does not become disproportionate and intolerable, especially to the females”; say this to them and they will sway slightly to and fro like babies sent to sleep in cradles. Say to them “Murder your mother,” and they sit up quite suddenly. Yet the two sentences, in cold logic, are exactly the same. Say to them “It is not improbable that a period may arrive when the narrow if once useful distinction between the anthropoid homo and the other animals, which has been modified on so many moral points, may be modified also even in regard to the important question of the extension of human diet”; say this to them, and beauty born of murmuring sound will pass into their face. But say to them, in a simple, manly, hearty way “Let’s eat a man!” and their surprise is quite surprising. Yet the sentences say just the same thing.  — G. K. Chesterton, Eugenics and Other Evils

But spin and euphemism thrive in the church as much as in culture.   Phrases such as “open minds” and “affirming” and “ecumenical” are code-words for elevating the opinions of man and the norms of culture over the authority of God’s Word.   Like the men of Jeremiah’s day we love our idols. We don’t call them idols, of course, but we install them in our churches and use double-speak to legitimize them.  What we fail to grasp is that our idols – traditionalism, works-righteousness, money, entertainment, affirmation, felt-needs, cultural relevance, church growth, etc. – will consume us.   Like invasive weeds, they crowd out vibrant, gracious Christian living and drain us dry.

There is no spin in Jeremiah’s words.  He speaks plainly and directly without any attempt to sugar-coat his message.  God’s people had abandoned the Lord for every conceivable idol.   Now God will abandon them to judgment.  They are beyond repentance.  In one of the Bible’s most terrifying passages — Jeremiah 7-8 — the prophet pulls back the curtain and shows the deadly effect of turning your back on God.  For the men of Judah, it is too late to turn back.  They have gone too far.  Even the prophet is forbidden to pray for them.   But it is not too late for you.  God gives this warning so you will turn back to Him.  Time and time again, the Scripture declares, “Today is the day of salvation.”

Join us this Sunday, August 25 as we consider from Jeremiah 7:16-8:3 what is ahead for those who are walking away from God and will not turn back.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.

Tin Men

Tin Men

Twice each year I undertake the Herculean task of cleaning the storage shed.  It takes an entire Saturday and involves nostalgic, logistical and utilitarian precision.  I have eight hours to unpack the geological column of our family history, triage the flotsam and jetsam to see what stays and what goes, clean out the remote corners of the shed, then pack it back with tetris-like precision.   Some things are easy.  High-school yearbooks and “special-things” stay.  Broken gardening vessels and punctured swimming floaties go.  But the perpetual members of the “on-the-fence” club are the old VBS craft projects.  They will not be used as décor, nor do they have any functional use.  Yet their value in nostalgia is worth its weight in gold.  Most prized among these are the family of “tin men.”

Like those pictured above, these creations were forged through the ambition of old-school VBS craft leaders and the patient endurance of the saints and children who assembled them.   They were meant to illustrate a very important truth, that the only hope for tin men is to receive a new heart.  Just as our only hope is to receive a new heart through faith in Jesus.  But they inadvertently stand witness to something else – to Christians whose outward profession declares orthodoxy, while their outward life-style professes heterodoxy.  Like tin men, many pious churchgoers have no new heart.  They know the songs, they recite the creeds, they pray the prayers, they fill the positions and the pews, but the testimony of their lives is at odds with the testimony of their lips.  Their confidence is not in the object of their faith, but the operation of their faith.  C. S. Lewis, described such men as “men without chests.”  He writes.

We make men without chests and expect from them virtue and enterprise…. We laugh at honor and are shocked to find traitors in our midst.

When God gives us a new heart, He gives also gives us new desires — desires to delight in His Law and to imitate His holiness.  Law and holiness are not the root of God’s grace in our lives, but they are always the fruit of it.  If we have no concern for God’s law or holiness, this is a warning sign that we are Christians without chests, spiritual tin men.  And tin men are in grave danger for a man without a heart is dead.

Spiritual tin men have great confidence, but their confidence is always a false confidence.  Jeremiah speaks to the spiritual tin men of his day calling them to “amend their ways.”  The were quite religious and loved all the ritual and activity, confident that their hope was in “the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.”  But  their lives showed that they had no concern for the Lord of the Temple, or his Law or His Holiness – sure evidence that they were men without chests.

Is your religion a grateful response to a gracious God?  Is your life animated by a new heart whose rhythm is in sync with God’s pace-making heart?   Does your life on Wednesday line up with your profession on Sunday? Or is your ritual, profession, and religious activity a cover-up for what is really under the hood – or rather what is not under the hood?   The Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz rightly understood his condition.

When a man’s an empty kettle
He should be on his mettle
And yet I’m torn apart
Just because I’m presumin’
That I could be kind of human
If I only had a heart. – The Tin Man

Are you a spiritual tin man?  Are you trusting in externals, in ritual, in your works, but lacking a new heart?  The beautiful truth of Jeremiah 7 is that amidst the prophet’s razor-sharp diagnosis, he offers the only sure remedy.

Join us this Sunday, August 18 as we consider the dangers of heartless Christianity and the only remedy for its terminal condition.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.

At the Crossroads

At the Crossroads

“Two paths diverged in a wood, and I – I took the path less traveled and that made all the difference.”  Most of us are familiar with these words from Robert Frost’s poem, The Road Not Taken.  It has become somewhat of a mantra for a generation required to memorize it in elementary school.   But it is as sage advice as it seems?  Sure, God created us with a passion to explore, create and innovate.  This is part of our dominion mandate, but like everything else about man’s glorious design, the effects of the fall inevitably turn our love of novelty into self-destruction.

Untethered from our Manufacturer’s directions, our adventurous spirit turns rogue and pursues every path but the safe one.   Contrary to Robert Frost’s seeming wisdom, the Romans had a less speculative but more practical proverb — Via trita via tuta  or “the well-worn way is the safe way.”  We would call this way “tried and true.”  Just as every inventor and innovator knows, technology is iterative.   We reach new heights, not by abandoning the old ways, but by building on the tested foundations. Yet our human pride leads us to despise the old ways and go down the “road less traveled.”   Where does it lead?  Often to ruin and heartache or just plain lostness.

Our expression, “to come to a crossroads” means to come to a place in life where our direction will determine our destination, where a critical decision must be made about which way to go.  Which direction are you headed?  Are you at a crossroads?  Are you at the place where you must decide whether to venture down the road less traveled or find safety in the well-worn way?   The people of Jeremiah’s day were at a crossroads.   They were rushing headlong to destruction.  With backs turned to God, God sent his prophet Jeremiah as a watchman to call them to turn back.  Through Jeremiah He calls them.

Thus says the Lord:
“Stand by the roads, and look,
    and ask for the ancient paths,
where the good way is; and walk in it,
    and find rest for your souls.
But they said, ‘We will not walk in it.’  – Jeremiah 6:16

The word translated “ancient”, means literally “eternal.”   God is not calling his people to return to tradition or simply “the way we have always done it.”  As social critic G. K. Chesterton warned us, “we have two great types — the advanced person who rushes us into ruin, and the retrospective person who admires the ruins.”  Simply being conservative is not enough, if what we are conserving are ‘ruins.’  Jeremiah’s call is to return not to the old ways, but the eternal ways — seek the well-worn, tried and true, eternally faithful path of God’s Word – His Word in Scripture and His Word Incarnate.

Life will bring us to many crossroads – crossroads in relationship, in vocation, in education and in a million life choices every day which have a lifelong impact.  Which path will you take – the road less traveled?  The path of pride and self-reliance? Or the via trita?  The right path at every crossroads is the same – “ask for the ancient paths, where the good way is; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls.”  Which way will you follow?   I pray that at the crossroads you ask for the eternal path and follow the One who is the Way, the Truth and the Life.

Join us this Sunday, August 11 as we consider our response when God brings us to the crossroads of life.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.

Self-Diagnosis

Self-Diagnosis

Long before there was Google, there was Dr. C. Everett Koop’s Self-Care Advisor: Essential Home Health Guide for You and Your Family.  A veritable hypochondriac’s playground, it was child’s play to follow the disease progression of every runny nose and headache to some dire diagnosis.  Certain members of our family were discouraged from consulting it, not because it wasn’t helpful, but simply because it was too easy to read our fears into every minor symptom.   And now we have Google, which allows us to believe every conceivable suggestion in the quest to convert our idiopathy into pathology.  While the internet is helpful at gaining awareness of our symptoms, it is not always the best diagnostic tool and often the worse prognostic tool.  Our preconceived fears make it impossible to be objective.

For this reason, we often give credence to every in-credible, speculative source of truth, while treating the most credible with skepticism or apathy.   Many, solidly convinced by Facebook posts reporting aliens in Area 51, scoff at the idea of Jonah being swallowed by a large fish or God creating the world in six twenty-four hour days.  But this credibility gap has less to do with the reasonableness of truth and more to do with its consequences.   There are no immediate consequences if I accept that there are aliens in Area 51, but there are pressing and immediate consequences if the Bible is true.   The moral demands of truth create a giant-blind spot for us called autonomy.

As bad as we are at self-diagnosing our physical ailments, the blind-spot of autonomy makes us utter quacks at recognizing our spiritual problems.   We hate to accept responsibility and look at everyone and everything else as the reason for our “dysfunction.”  The culture of victimization is as old as the world.  When confronted with his sin, the first man Adam quickly blamed both his wife and God.  “The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit of the tree and I ate.” Genesis 3:12

But God has given us his word as a spiritual mirror, reflecting accurately our true condition. The scripture is able to accurately diagnose our spiritual condition and offer us the only known cure.  The problem is that our pride refuses to acknowledge what we see there.  God sent the prophet Jeremiah to his people as they approached the precipice of divine judgment, but their stubborn pride turned away from the thought of turning away from their sin.  As we look on from our perspective in history, we can see their foolish stubbornness and gasp at their stunning unbelief.  But are we that different?

Are we living our lives deaf and blind to the repeated calling of the word of God to confess and repent and find mercy?  Will we look into the mirror of the law of God and see our real diagnosis and seek the only cure?  Or will the blind spot of autonomy cause us to follow every quack remedy for our spiritually terminal condition?   Jeremiah condemned the people of his day because they wanted to be lied to about their condition.

“An appalling and horrible thing has happened in the land:  the prophets prophesy falsely and the priests rule at their discretion; my people love to have it so.  But what will you do in the end? … [for the prophets and priests] have healed the wound of my people lightly saying, ‘Peace, peace’ when there is no peace.”  Jeremiah 5:31, 6:14

Join us this Sunday, August 4 as we consider what spiritual stubbornness looks like and see how the word of God diagnoses our real condition and offers us a proven cure.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.

Donor Match

Donor Match

Some days seem to take forever to arrive.   As a boy, Christmas day and the last day of school seemed as though they would never come.  Like a mirage on a hot summer highway, as you move toward them, they only seemed to be further away.  But what if that long-awaited day was a matter of life and death?  What if you were waiting for a heart or liver transplant in order to live?

Those who need an organ transplant are placed on a waiting list for a donated organ. Transplant organs are matched to patients based on a large list of criteria including: blood type, tissue type, medical urgency, body size, and distance from donor hospital to recipient hospital.  The process is never based simply on your position on the list.  Unfortunately, there are a lot more people on the waiting list than there are organs available each year.

Depending on how well you are, you may wait for your organ transplant at home or in a hospital. It is impossible to anticipate exactly when one will become available.  Some people wait only a few days while for others the wait much longer, possibly many months, if at all.  The waiting, the wondering, and the worrying become all consuming.  What if it never comes?  What if no match can be found for me?  As the time passes, desperation increases and the difficulty of holding on to hope grows exponentially. And if an organ is found, the danger of the transplant and high likelihood of rejection weigh heavily.

Then the call comes – a donor match has been found — and all the emotions converge.  Hope shines in and the life-giving gift is given by another whose gift cost them everything.   While heart and liver transplants have become almost routine today, it is never routine if it is you waiting and praying for a donor match.  But what if your fatal diagnosis is more than physical?  What if you have a failing soul and spirit?  What if your heart of hearts is failing for a lack of righteousness and faithfulness?  You seek diligently some other person – a counselor, a teacher, a lover, a friend — who can give you what you need to fill that growing emptiness in your heart, to stop the metastatic corruption of sin and guilt that threatens your life for all eternity.

But no matching donor can be found.  Every teacher, every counselor, every lover, every friend, every good man or woman, every role model — they are all on the waiting list as well.   Life is ebbing away, time is ticking, a donor must be found.   But where can we find a donor match for our sin-sick soul?   This was the question posed to the prophet Jeremiah in Jeremiah 5.  Jerusalem has been given a terminal diagnosis.  The sin-sickness of the people had metastasized into every area of their lives from worship to family life to social injustice.  God commands Jeremiah.

Run to and fro through the streets of Jerusalem,
    look and take note!
Search her squares to see
    if you can find a man,
one who does justice
    and seeks truth,
that I may pardon her.    Jeremiah 5:1

Jeremiah looks everywhere.  He looks among the ordinary people.  He looks at the leaders, the wealthy, the scholars, and the movers-and-shakers.  Surely, he can find such a man among the priest and prophets.  But there is no match.  As the Psalmist said.

They have all turned aside; together they have become corrupt;
    there is none who does good,
    not even one.  Psalm 14:3.

No even one!  No donor can be found.  The situation is desperate.   God had promised to spare Sodom and Gomorrah if only ten righteous could be found, but Jerusalem’s judgment depended on just one.  Despite Jeremiah’s diligent search no righteous man could be found.   This is the desperation of our own spiritual situation.  Dying from a depraved soul, we need a righteousness transplant.  But can a donor be found?  The good news is that a perfect donor match exists.

Jesus Christ is a perfect donor match for your diseased soul.  Made like us in every way, fully man yet fully God, His perfect obedience and atoning death on the cross make his perfect righteousness available to those who will receive it.   He alone is the way, the truth and the life.  But as with someone on the transplant list, it is not enough for the donor to be found.  The donated organ must be received by transplant.  This happens for us when we place our faith in Jesus and repent of our diseased life.  Have you received a transplanted life from Jesus?

Join us this Sunday, July 28 as we consider the good news that a donor match has been found to transplant in us the new heart we need to live.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.