Some things can be seen with our eyes, while others require a microscope or telescope.   But some things are seen purely by the effect they have on everything around them.  This is the story of the discovery of the planet Neptune.  Too distant to be easily seen with 19th century telescopes, Neptune was first observed with mathematics.

Following the discovery of Uranus in 1781 by British astronomer, William Herschel, several astronomers observing its long orbit noticed anomalies.  There were significant discrepancies between where it was and where it should have been.  The mathematics of its orbital path did not add up.

The perplexity of Uranus’ orbit caused astronomers to consider the possibility of new planet somewhere beyond it.  French astronomer Urbain Le Verrier began using mathematics to locate mystery planet’s position in June 1845.   On September 23, 1846, German astronomer, Johann Gotfried Galle, used Le Verrier’s calculations to find Neptune only 1° off Le Verrier’s predicted position.  By computing the gravitational effects of the previously unknown Neptune on Uranus’ orbit, astronomers were able to locate the new planet. 

In the same way, the effects of our lives on others may make visible, that which would otherwise be unseen.  God’s grace cannot be seen, but its effects are unmistakable.  Grace changes our standing before God, but it also radically transforms our standing with others.  Grace tugs, it attracts.  Like the unseen gravity of Neptune, when our lives are seasoned with grace they produce an observable effect upon those around us.   This is expressed powerfully in the little letter of Paul to Titus.

For the grace of God has appeared, bringing salvation for all people, training us to renounce ungodliness and worldly passions, and to live self-controlled, upright, and godly lives in the present age, waiting for our blessed hope, the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior Jesus Christ, who gave himself for us to redeem us from all lawlessness and to purify for himself a people for his own possession who are zealous for good works.  Titus 2:11-14

Titus was a fixer.  He was the man Paul entrusted to work with his most challenging churches.  He delivered two “hot” letters to the church in Corinth and was tasked by Paul to put in order the fledgling churches on Crete.  Ironically both of these places, Corinth and Crete were proverbial in the ancient world for their immorality.  Corinth was infamous for its sexual immorality.  While Cretans had a well attested reputation as liars and as brutal people.

So notorious were the Cretans that the Greeks actually formed a verb kretizein, to cretize, which meant to lie and to cheat; and they had a proverbial phrase, kretizein pros Kreta, to cretize against a Cretan, which meant to match lies with lies, as diamond cuts diamond.  – William Barclay

When instructing Titus in how to handle the people on Crete, Paul quotes the ancient poet Epiminedes

One of the Cretans, a prophet of their own, said, “Cretans are always liars, evil beasts, lazy gluttons.” This testimony is true. Therefore rebuke them sharply, that they may be sound in the faith.  Titus 1:12-13

Even among our modern insults, to be called Cretan still stings.   If anyone seemed impervious to the gospel,  it was the Cretans, yet the gospel is the power of salvation for all men.  The grace of God had taken root in that godless place.  So much so that  when Titus was instructed to look for faithful men to lead the churches, Paul fully expected him to find them.   The effect of the gospel in Crete was radical, placing the Cretan Christians in stark contrast with the reputation of their kinsmen.  How powerful is the tug of grace in your life?  Is the gravity of grace in your life causing an observable effect in the lives of your family, neighbors and coworkers?

Join us this Sunday, June 2, as we examine Paul’s letter to Titus and consider how God’s grace in us exerts an effect on the lives of others.  We meet from 5:00 – 6:30 pm in The Commons at St. Andrews Anglican Church at 8300 Kanis Rd in Little Rock.  Click here for directions. Come with a friend and join us for fellowship and worship. We look forward to seeing you there.